Boaty McBoatface Has Returned From Its Inaugural Mission With a Trove of Data

The most famous yellow submarine world has returned home after a successful mission in the Weddell Sea of ​​Antarctica. Boaty McBoatface's expedition organizers claim "unprecedented" data captured during their first voyage, analyzing the current depth of more than 13,000 feet deep. Boaty is back in Britain, with his mother-in-law crew, Sir David Attenborough. The mission, which involves scientists from British Antarctic territory, the National Oceanography Center and the University of Southampton, is an effort to study one of the coolest ocean currents on Earth - an ice abyssal zone known to Orkney Passage. By mapping the ocean current in detail, scientists hope to better understand the dynamics of ocean mixing and how climate change impacts. The name of this submarine, if it has forgotten, comes from a 2016 campaign by the Research Council on the natural environment to name the new polar research vessel in the United Kingdom. The public voted for Shipy McBoatface, but the British government, who lacks a sense of humor, refused to let it happen, choosing a name for the ship after the naturalist Sir David Attenborough. To appease the masses, an autonomous yellow submarine was christened Boaty McBoatface place. During his seven-week inaugural mission, Boaty traveled more than 110 miles (180 km), reaching depths of 13,000 feet (4,000 meters), where the waters reach temperatures below zero. The Boaty work was carried out in the Weddell Sea about 500 miles (800 km) from the Antarctic Peninsula. Walking through the Orkney Pass, Boaty used his onboard instruments to measure water temperature, water flow velocity and turbulence rates. Measures have also been taken in the ship's instruments. "We have been able to collect large amounts of data that we have never been able to capture before due to the way ... Boaty can move underwater," Alberto Naveira Garabato, a scientist at Southampton University, said in a statement. "So far, we could only act from a fixed point, but now we can get a much more detailed picture of what is happening in this very important underwater landscape. The challenge for us now is to analyze all this. " To see Boaty's progress, the researchers created an animation flight of the passage. Boaty carried out three missions during his expedition, the longest of which lasted three days. The underground stream has had problems at the start of a mission as it crossed a swarm of krill so thick that its radar thought it was about to crush the bottom of the sea. The autonomous submarine was redirected to the surface, although it is only 260 feet (80 meters). With everyone at home and dry, researchers now begin to analyze and interpret all these new data. By the way Orkney, the currents of the sea through a "bottleneck" that go to the Weddell Sea from Antarctica to the Atlantic Ocean. These currents act as a kind of dive conveyor belt, bringing cold water into the equatorial regions of the planet. Scientists fear that the changing winds of the Southern Ocean are creating warmer layers of water, which could change the dynamics of the ocean current. Great job, Boaty! With your stupid Monique ridiculous, we care about you and your important mission.

Boaty McBoatface Has Returned From Its Inaugural Mission With a Trove of Data

Boaty McBoatface Has Returned From Its Inaugural Mission With a Trove of Data

The most famous yellow submarine world has returned home after a successful mission in the Weddell Sea of ​​Antarctica.

Boaty McBoatface’s expedition organizers claim “unprecedented” data captured during their first voyage, analyzing the current depth of more than 13,000 feet deep.

Boaty is back in Britain, with his mother-in-law crew, Sir David Attenborough.

The mission, which involves scientists from British Antarctic territory, the National Oceanography Center and the University of Southampton, is an effort to study one of the coolest ocean currents on Earth – an ice abyssal zone known to Orkney Passage.

By mapping the ocean current in detail, scientists hope to better understand the dynamics of ocean mixing and how climate change impacts.

The name of this submarine, if it has forgotten, comes from a 2016 campaign by the Research Council on the natural environment to name the new polar research vessel in the United Kingdom.

The public voted for Shipy McBoatface, but the British government, who lacks a sense of humor, refused to let it happen, choosing a name for the ship after the naturalist Sir David Attenborough. To appease the masses, an autonomous yellow submarine was christened Boaty McBoatface place.

During his seven-week inaugural mission, Boaty traveled more than 110 miles (180 km), reaching depths of 13,000 feet (4,000 meters), where the waters reach temperatures below zero.

The Boaty work was carried out in the Weddell Sea about 500 miles (800 km) from the Antarctic Peninsula. Walking through the Orkney Pass, Boaty used his onboard instruments to measure water temperature, water flow velocity and turbulence rates. Measures have also been taken in the ship’s instruments.

“We have been able to collect large amounts of data that we have never been able to capture before due to the way … Boaty can move underwater,” Alberto Naveira Garabato, a scientist at Southampton University, said in a statement.

“So far, we could only act from a fixed point, but now we can get a much more detailed picture of what is happening in this very important underwater landscape.

The challenge for us now is to analyze all this. ”

To see Boaty’s progress, the researchers created an animation flight of the passage.

Boaty carried out three missions during his expedition, the longest of which lasted three days. The underground stream has had problems at the start of a mission as it crossed a swarm of krill so thick that its radar thought it was about to crush the bottom of the sea.

The autonomous submarine was redirected to the surface, although it is only 260 feet (80 meters).

With everyone at home and dry, researchers now begin to analyze and interpret all these new data.

By the way Orkney, the currents of the sea through a “bottleneck” that go to the Weddell Sea from Antarctica to the Atlantic Ocean.

These currents act as a kind of dive conveyor belt, bringing cold water into the equatorial regions of the planet.

Scientists fear that the changing winds of the Southern Ocean are creating warmer layers of water, which could change the dynamics of the ocean current.

Great job, Boaty! With your stupid Monique ridiculous, we care about you and your important mission.

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